Machine Learning in Medical Imaging.

Maryellen L Giger,


Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR, November 30, -0001


Advances in both imaging and computers have synergistically led to a rapid rise in the potential use of artificial intelligence in various radiological imaging tasks, such as risk assessment, detection, diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy response, as well as in multi-omics disease discovery. A brief overview of the field is given here, allowing the reader to recognize the terminology, the various subfields, and components of machine learning, as well as the clinical potential. Radiomics, an expansion of computer-aided diagnosis, has been defined as the conversion of images to minable data. The ultimate benefit of quantitative radiomics is to (1) yield predictive image-based phenotypes of disease for precision medicine or (2) yield quantitative image-based phenotypes for data mining with other -omics for discovery (ie, imaging genomics). For deep learning in radiology to succeed, note that well-annotated large data sets are needed since deep networks are complex, computer software and hardware are evolving constantly, and subtle differences in disease states are more difficult to perceive than differences in everyday objects. In the future, machine learning in radiology is expected to have a substantial clinical impact with imaging examinations being routinely obtained in clinical practice, providing an opportunity to improve decision support in medical image interpretation. The term of note is decision support, indicating that computers will augment human decision making, making it more effective and efficient. The clinical impact of having computers in the routine clinical practice may allow radiologists to further integrate their knowledge with their clinical colleagues in other medical specialties and allow for precision medicine.

Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.


Pubmed Link: 29398494

DOI: 10.1016/j.jacr.2017.12.028